DIY PROM

It’s prom time, so let’s talk about hair and makeup!

If there’s one thing I (Jessy the Librarian) love as much as stories, it’s probably lipstick. Or maybe eyeliner. One of the best place I’ve found for (non-video) makeup/hair tutorials is The Beauty Department. I love the idea of a metallic eye, especially if your dress is more of a matte texture, like tulle.

Last month, OPI released 4 sheer tint polishes. Look at all the pretty ideas Phoenix Beauty Lounge came up with!

nail-art-ideas-with-opi-sheer-tints-jpeg

 

When it comes to pretty hair, my own personal taste is basically “shove it all up behind your head in a messy chignon or at the nape of your neck in a messy bun with lots of pretty bobby pins.” But this isn’t a blog about what Jessy the Librarian would dress up like; it’s full of tips and tricks and DIYs for all sorts of tastes!

If you have straight hair (or want to straighten your hair for prom), Martha Stewart has lots of guides.

If you have curly hair, there are guides for pretty updos here and here.

If you want complicated pretty braids (and really, who doesn’t), what about a waterfall braid? Here’s a tutorial video I found on youtube.

358e7755166b80cf2541abacd401b446

Want more ideas for prom hair and makeup? Check out our prom-related pinterest board!

This post was written by Durr Young Adult Librarian Jessy.

100 Years Ago, Latonia Jockey Reached Horse Racing’s Pinnacle

Latonia Boy Wins Great English Race, 27 May 1914 cropped

The Kentucky Post headline the evening Matt won the Epsom Derby. The win marked a first for anyone from the Cincinnati area in the race and one of the few times to that point an American owner and jockey took the event.

On May 27, 1914 a record crowd gathered at the historic Epsom Downs in England for the annual running of the world’s greatest horse race, the English Derby.  The dramatic death of suffragette Emily Davison on the track the year prior and the nearly unprecedented 30 horse field drew a large crowd who knew that quite anything could happen at the annual event.[1]  The tension mounted precipitously at the post line as the horses waited for the starter’s signal.  Matt McGee, an American jockey born and raised in Covington sitting atop of his fine colt Durbar II, stared down the track towards the outside rail and saw the crowd favorite Kennymore growing anxious for the start.  At 9-4 odds, and with Europe’s top jockey and future racing Hall of Famer Frank O’Neill aboard, the horse was thought to be shoo-in for victory, even with the crowded field.   The other rival for the title, Brakespear, owned by none other than the King of England himself, waited patiently close to the inside rail.  The 20 minutes standing at the line must have seemed like an eternity for the horse, however, as he frequently backed away from the starting tape.  The signal to go caught Brakespear off-guard and led to a poor start while the anxious Kennymore took off perpendicular to the rest of the field, racing directly towards the inside rail.

Matt on Durbar 27 May 1914

Matt aboard the winning Durbar II, with H.B. Duryea leading the pair into the winner’s circle.

At the half mile mark of the mile and a half race, McGee pulled Durbar into fourth place, a few lengths behind pace setter Polycrates.  MacGee had ridden Durbar to victory in France prior to this day, pulling out some minor victories in a couple of stakes races, before being placed by owner Herman Duryea in this day’s race.  At 20-1 odds, the horse took some light bets but was off of the radar of most enthusiasts in the build up to the race.  McGee saw an opening as the field approached the famous turn at Tattanham’s Corner and slipped Durbar in front at the rail.  He quickly pulled away from the field down the stretch and passed the finish line a full three lengths ahead of his nearest competitor.  The crowd fell into a hushed silence.  Two Americans with a French and American bred horse had taken the coveted prize, much to the chagrin of the proud English folks in the crowd.  Duryea likely fell into shock as well.  Not necessarily from the win, but rather from the payout on the $4,000 bet he placed on his own horse in addition to the $32,000 race prize.[2]  Matt McGee, the little jockey from Latonia, Kentucky reached the pinnacle of his racing career at this moment and calmly remarked to reporters, “I had never had an easier race in my life.”

Jockey Colony at Santa Anita

This photo from a March 1909 edition of the Los Angeles Herald shows the jockeys at Santa Anita during the racing season. Matt is second from the left in the bottom row.

Matt’s racing career began in his hometown, at the old Latonia Racetrack where many residents had strong ties to the horse racing industry.  Matt and two of his brothers, all of diminutive Irish stock, attempted careers as jockeys, but only Matt proved successful in the trade.  Beginning in 1908, he raced for four years in the United States.  He traveled about the country trying to find work while Progressive reformers cracked down on the racing and gaming industries in states like New York and California.  In fact, the closure of tracks in huge markets like California and New York were in some ways directly responsible for the rise of horse racing in Kentucky.  The Bluegrass State’s reputation for feuds, moonshine, and general lawlessness made many in the thoroughbred industry set their sights on the state as a refuge for continued racing.[3] After his first year on the courses, the American Racing Manual remarked that “McGee….gave indications that [he] may be challenging the leaders in a year or two.”  His contract was sold to a California stable where he enjoyed the last racing season in Los Angeles before anti-gambling legislation shut down the races.  In 1909, Matt finished fifth among the jockeys overall in wins, with 150 coming in a career high 862 mounts.  That year he also raced in his first Kentucky Derby, though he finished in ninth place aboard Campeon.  In the year 1911 he rode perhaps his greatest horse, a chestnut filly named Round the World.  The horse won many races in the buildup to the Kentucky Derby, including a huge prize at the Juarez Derby in Mexico that made her a favorite in the days leading up to the Derby.   The horse tired from overwork as she ran numerous tune-up races in Lexington in the weeks prior to the Derby, a far cry from the limited workload of modern thoroughbreds.  Matt led her across the finish line that year in sixth place in the seven horse field, an assured disappointment in one of the most thrilling Derby races to that point.  After the 1911 Kentucky Derby, Matt officially retired from American racing as the pressures on making weight finally became too much.  He had contemplated the move for a time, but waited until after the Derby to make his decision out of an agreement with his owner to race the special filly in the major events. Europe offered greater opportunity and with the closures of so many tracks across the United States a flood of jockeys and others in the thoroughbred industry made their way to the continent.  Matt joined those on the move in 1913 and began racing with Herman Duryea during that year.  Matt quickly became his top jockey and their two years together netted the pair steady profits in many of the large races around France.  The victory lap after the

McGee on Flowershop, Prix de Diane 1920

Matt aboard Flowershop after winning the Prix de Diane in 1920. The race is the equivalent of the Kentucky Oaks, run the day before the Derby, open to three year old fillies and run at the Chantilly racecourse outside of Paris.

1914 English Derby was cut short, however, when nearly one month to the day after the race Austro-Hungarian prince Franz Ferdinand was assassinated in what amounted to the sounding bell for World War I.  As nations mobilized for war, racing was shut down and many jockeys and horses were called to serve in the fight.  In late September, 1914, Durbar was smuggled out of the war zone draped in an American flag and declared “neutral” in the fight, as he eventually made his way to the United States.  Matt and his family left as well for a time, though they eventually returned amid the fighting when racing resumed on a limited basis in 1915.

 

Matt and his family stayed in France after the war as well and his racing career continued relatively unimpeded into the 1930s.  He perpetually finished towards the top of the list among winning jockeys, though most often finding himself in second place behind rival and friend Frank O’Neill.  Upon his retirement, he settled in to a comfortable life training and raising horses for the Rothschild family near his home outside of Paris.  The bellicose calls for war sent Matt home again in the spring of 1941 after the German army overran his town and reportedly used his home as officers’ quarters and as a base of operation.  He returned to Covington alone to a family he had not seen in nearly a decade.  His wife and daughter soon followed, though the family never reunited totally.  His wife Laura fell victim to cancer and died in Chicago in 1945.  Matt followed in October 1949 and was laid to rest in Mother of God cemetery in Fort Wright.  His daughter returned to France after the war and according to family lore, sought to reclaim the family’s lost fortunes.

Matt's Wife and Child

Numerous trips across the ocean meant lots of travel records. These passport records come from a 1920 request for residence in Lamorlaye, France. On the shows Matt’s daughter, Norma Frances, was born in Lamorlaye in 1915. His wife, Laura Brown, traveled alongside the the jockey until they left France for good in 1941. Passport photos courtesy ancestry.com

As we approach another Kentucky Derby this coming May, we are all reminded of the importance of the horse racing industry to the state’s history.  The Kenton County Library offer vast resources for those interested in learning more about racing history.  The Keeneland Racetrack library, in partnership with the University of Kentucky and the Kentucky Virtual Library, has digitized nearly the entire run of the Daily Racing Form.  In addition to form charts, race results, and general racing news the paper also covered political activity relating to national issues, like the interruptions of the World Wars, and local issues like the battle over the annexation of Latonia to the city of Covington.  The Latonia Racetrack’s prominence in the industry also made it a popular topic in local papers.[4]  Digital editions of the historic Cincinnati Enquirer and the Louisville Courier Journal are available for access in the library or at home with a library card.  The Northern Kentucky Newspaper Index also has coverage of some local figures and events and patrons can access the newspapers on microfilm in the Covington library.  Finding information outside the United States can be much trickier and may require some language fluency, but information is available.  France has a wonderful collection of digitized photos, periodicals, and books available through their national library and keyword searches can reveal a wealth of information in addition to offering a different perspective on events in the United States.    Contact the Local History and Genealogy Department at the Covington Branch of the Kenton County Library if you would like help researching anything related to local or national racing history.  Also stop by the branch for a display with more about the history of Matt McGee’s racing career.

Written by Nate McGee, Library Associate, Local History and Genealogy Department, Covington

[1] Davison, the suffragette, threw herself in front of the King of England’s horse as he approached the finish line and became at martyr for the suffrage cause in the British Isles.  In 1914, a policeman was shot by Ada Rice, a presumed suffragette, but no serious injury occurred.

[2] The prize money alone would be valued at close to $1 million today.

[3] See Maryjean Wall’s great book, How Kentucky Became Southern, for more on this process and the rise of racing overall in the state.

[4] Check out James Claypool’s fine history of the Latonia Racetrack, The Tradition Continues:  The Story of Old Latonia, Latonia, and Turfway Racetracks for a good comprehensive history of Racing in northern Kentucky.

Turning Clutter Into Cash

turning-clutter-into-cash

 

Many people have trouble decluttering because they see their clutter as piles of cash that they spent. I know that I am less of an impulse shopper now that I have given away items that I had to have but then never used.

Decluttering is humbling. You realize you have more than you need and often wish you could have a “do over” and get that money back.

Before the great recession of 2008, I could make a great deal of money back on my used items through garage sales, eBay sales and consignment stores. But since the recession – many people have joined the resale community and driven down the price people are willing to pay for used items.

This spring as you are decluttering your house, set up a selling and donation staging area. You can earn some summer fun money by taking your items to various resale shops.

1. Garage Sales

If you have a LOT to get rid of, you may want to consider a garage sale. I have had good luck with selling furniture, children’s items and craft supplies. If you are going to have a garage sale – set up an area of your home NOW to start collecting your “treasures.” Set a date and work like crazy to have all of your decluttering done by that date. {NOTE for 3 years I had garage sales in the spring and fall. It took me 6 garage sales to get my clutter to a manageable level!}

Set up EARLY and be prepared for people to come even earlier. I usually have mine on a Friday from 8-2 and Saturday 8-12.

I don’t even price my items anymore. You can have a blanket and say everything on the blanket is $1.

Market your garage sale by putting pictures and descriptions of popular items on Craig’s List. Have change and grocery bags for people to take their treasures home.

Plan for Saturday at noon – where is the rest of this stuff going? It is NOT going back inside! :) Divide what you have left and try these options:

Organizing Your Home Library | Optimistic Mommy

2. Half Price Books

Normally, I earn between $6-10 at Half Price Books. The pay is ridiculously low. I was tempted to take my last banker’s box full of books straight to Goodwill, but decided to stop by Half Price Books first. I was SO glad I did; I earned $22.50!

40 Weeks 1 Whole House: Week 27: Organizing Board Games, Video Games and Puzzles | Organize 365

3. Game Stop

These games are really old; they wouldn’t even take 3 of them! But I did make $29 on this stack of games. Let’s not do the math on how much I PAID!

4. Consignment Stores

Each season, I take a few clothes out of my closet and stop by the consignment store before I hit Goodwill. I make about $75 per season selling old clothes. I turn right around and buy about 6-8 items with that money at the same consignment shop. For the past 6 years, I have spent very little on my clothing outside of consignment shops.

Time To Change Out Your Closet | Organize 365

5. Child resale shops

If you have kid’s clothes, old toys or furniture, the kid’s resale shops are the way to go. You will earn even less than you will get at a garage sale, but you will get something.

6. eBay

eBay is a great way to sell name brand items that you can sell for $20 or more. I say $20 because the fees and shipping eat up a lot of cost when selling on eBay. The best way to tell if an item is worth selling on eBay is to search for that item and see how many are being sold and at what price.

7. Craig’s List

Craig’s List is similar to eBay in that you are selling on line, but instead of shipping the item, you meet the buyer in real life. I have had success selling furniture this way.

You need to know how much you want for the item and know people will haggle with you AFTER they come to your house. I find this annoying.

For safety, I list items with the Craig’s List fake email that forwards to my email. Then, I reply with my cell phone number. I have never had a problem selling on Craig’s List, but as I mentioned above, there are “deals” for buying, but selling has been harder since 2008.

Goodwill

8. Goodwill

I know you will not “make” money by donating to Goodwill, but you can get a tax deduction. I have always liked the convenience of dropping off my donations at the Goodwill drop off center. But last year I listened to this podcast about all the donations Goodwill takes and what they do with them. Then I went to a meeting and learned all about the amazing resource that Goodwill is to the special needs community in my area.

Now when I have a donation, I feel like I am really giving and not just “getting rid of” my old stuff.

So, what about you? What do you do with items you no longer need?

Check out our Pinterest board on the topic!

 

This guest post is written by Lisa Woodruff with Organize 365

NKY Fandom Fest

Each year the Teen Librarians at KCPL, BCPL, and CCPL get together to host an event celebrating anime, cartoons, and comics! In the past it was known as NKY Cosplay, and is now called NKY FANDOM FEST!

Fans of everything from Death Note to Dr. Who, Adventure Time to Avengers, Homestuck and Hunger Games are welcome! Costumes are not required for the event, but you do have to be in middle or high school to attend.

NKY Fandom Fest is Saturday, March 29th from 6-8:30 pm. at the BCPL Main Branch. Doors open at 5:45 pm.

fandom fest cosplay 14

At Fandom Fest you can expect these events and activities!

  • Door prizes
  • Costume Contest
  • Japanese snacks
  • Freaky Food Contest
  • Arts & Crafts
  • Free books & comics
  • Tabletop Gaming
  • Non-stop music of your choice

To register and stay up to date with event details check out our Facebook page!

Willy Wonka Jr. Ticket Giveaway

bob herzog willy wonka

Most of us know Roald Dahl’s timeless story of the world-famous candy man and his quest to find an heir. But it’s not everyday we get to watch it come to life in this stage adaptation of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, which features the songs from the classic family film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory at The Children’s Theatre of CincinnatiRoald Dahl’s Willy Wonka JR. featuring a memorable score by Leslie Bricusse (Jekyll & HydeDoctor Dolittle) and Anthony Newley, follows enigmatic candy manufacturer Willy Wonka as he stages a contest by hiding five golden tickets in five of his scrumptious candy bars. Whoever comes up with these tickets will win a free tour of the Wonka factory, as well as a lifetime supply of candy. Four of the five winning children are insufferable brats: the fifth is a likable young lad named Charlie Bucket who takes the tour in the company of his equally amiable grandfather. The children must learn to follow Mr. Wonka’s rules in the factory–or suffer the consequences.

Bob Herzog, Local 12 News Anchor/Reporter and inventor of Dance Party Friday, will play Willy Wonka.

Tickets start at $11 each. Public performance times include:

Friday, April 4 at 7:30 PM
Saturday, April 5 at 2 PM
Saturday, April 5 at 5 PM
Sunday, April 6 at 2 PM
Saturday, April 12 at 2 PM

Kenton County Public Library is giving away a voucher for four tickets to Ronald Dahl’s Willy Wonka Jr. on Friday, April 4 at 7:30 p.m. or Saturday, April 5 at 5 p.m.

How to enter to win: You have four chances to win. Comment separately for each entry for each chance to be considered. Enter by noon on Monday, March 24. The winner will be notified and have 24 hours to respond or another winner will be chosen. The winner will be chosen randomly with random.org.

1. Comment here saying why you want to win (required to enter).

2. Share this contest on Facebook or twitter and comment here that you did.

3. Like us on Facebook and comment here that you did.

4. Like The Children’s Theatre of Cincinnati on Facebook and comment here that you did.

Disclaimer: The Children’s Theatre of Cincinnati gave the Library tickets to give away. Library employees and those living in their household cannot win.

Rhythm and Rhyme: Sensory Storytime

Rhythm and Rhyme: Sensory Storytime is a monthly interactive and educational program. It is specially designed for children ages 2-6 with sensory integration challenges.

It combines the books, rhymes and music of other storytimes along with physical activities to promote learning in a sensory friendly environment. Many children with Sensory Processing Disorders are extra sensitive to loud noises, bright lights, or other strong sensory environments. In this program, the lights are dimmed, the music is not as loud, and there are minimal distractions while the program is taking place.

There is repetition from month to month so the children know what to expect. We also go over the activities for the day before beginning each program. After we share a short book, rhymes, and songs there is social time where interactive experiences are offered to the children. These activities include sensory tubs to search through, toys to play with, sidewalk chalk, bubbles, and other activities to stimulate tactile learning.

Although this program is aimed at children with Sensory Processing Disorders, if your child has difficulty sitting through one of the library’s other storytimes, this inclusive program of stories, songs, and activities may be a better fit for him or her.

If you would like to register for the program, please check our Event Calendar.

julie mills

If you would like further information, please feel free to contact me at julie.mills@kentonlibrary.org regarding the Erlanger Branch programs or Joel Caithamer at joel.caithamer@kentonlibrary.org regarding the Durr Branch programs. We look forward to seeing you there!

6 technology personality types: which class sounds like you?

Image

The Apprentice

Not all of us have used a computer, created a free email account or mastered how to use a scanner.   Are you new to computers? Maybe you have a friend or grandparent who is ready to try?  All three branches offer classes for new or inexperienced computer users. Our teachers are skilled at helping people who are just starting out. Durr even has open labs for one-to-one help.

Upcoming classes:
First Time Computer Users
Internet for Beginners
Create an Email
Exploring the Internet
Saving your files, and organizing your PC
One on One Digital Services Assistance
One on One Photo Scanning and Editing

Image

The Professional

Who doesn’t need to update their Microsoft Office skills with new versions coming out all the time? Learn how to make logical spreadsheets, impressive presentations or flyers with impact. When you finish the complete series (Word, Excel, Publisher, PowerPoint), add your new skills to your resume and start looking to apply them in our job searching on the Internet and resume classes.

Upcoming classes:
Microsoft Excel
Microsoft Publisher
Job Searching and the Internet
Microsoft PowerPoint
Microsoft Word

Image

The Gadget Whiz

You love your devices but want to know more about how to use them.  Yes, your phone and your tablet are fun and useful tools.  But what are some great apps? What can you iPad really do? How can I access use the library with apps? Maybe your curious about purchasing an e-Reader like a Nook or Kindle instead.  Our app, iPad, and e-Reader classes will have you reading and searching on the go in new and interesting ways.

Upcoming classes:
Top iOs and Android Apps
iPad Tips & Tricks
Library Apps for Your iPad or Android
Introduction to e-Readers

Image

Connected Lunchtime Learner

Grab your lunch and put on your headset, it’s time to multitask. Want to get the basics of how to borrow ebooks or download Runner’s World on your iPad for free? These online classes help you learn about the community and the often forgotten online resources the library offers.  We are always looking for speakers and topics for online classes. Submit a name or add your idea by filling out this form.

Upcoming classes:
The library on your iPad, iPhone, or Android
Searching Consumer Reports
Value Line and Morningstar
Quick guide to e-books
Bike month and the Flying Pig: online cycling and running books and magazines
Open Education: learning for free

Image

The Creative Guru

Technology is your tool to make and create.  You’ve always wanted to learn more about what Adobe products can do and secretly want to start a Maker Lab in your basement. Curious about how to print 3D designs?  Wanting to build skills in graphic design to make brochures, edit images, and make amazing graphics?  Maybe you want to introduce your kids to programming.  These classes are for the maker in you.  Note: the Adobe classes will be lecture style so bring your laptop if you have the programs. Coding will take place on library computers.

Upcoming classes:
3D Printing

Adobe InDesign
Adobe Photoshop
Adobe Illustrator
Kid Coders

Image

The Web Adventurer

So many websites so little time.  We all use the Internet but you want to make the most of it to find better information, score great deals, and sell your wares. You aspire to master Google and tweet and pin  like a social media star. Wondering how to  plan your vacation and share the photos when you’ve returned from paradise? Looking for long lost relatives? Learn how to find them with genealogy research sites.  These educational and entertaining classes save you time and money, are fun to attend,  and will bring our the web explorer in you.

Upcoming classes:
Google
Search
Pin Pictures with Pinterest
Getting the Most from Online Genealogy Research
Intro to Craigslist & Free Cycle
Vacation Photo’s
Vacation Planning Online
Buying and Selling on eBay
Intro to Etsy
PicMonkey
Twitter Tips & Tricks

You don’t have to fit these personalities to take these great classes and learn something today. Search for computer classes on our events page by visiting  http://www.kentonlibrary.org/events and selecting “Computer” under Categories or “Online” under Location.

Rather learn on your own?

Create an account with your library card and use computer tutorials from LearningExpress Programs: Microsoft Office, Adobe Creative Suite, and Windows and Mac OS

Check out great books

Web Development
Microsoft
Graphics software (Adobe and more)
Social Media
eBay
Computers

Download e-books

ImageImageImage

ImageImageImage

Subscribe to digital magazines in Zinio

ImageImage

ImageImage