Preparing Your Child For Preschool

The summer can be a busy season for most preschool teachers and parents.  We’ve been cooped up with the kids all winter long and even in the spring (as I write this April, 15th there is snow on the ground). As the mom of 4-year-old and 8-month-old boys I know how much energy has been stored up through the winter and needs to be released. My 4-year-old Aiden wants to run, play and get as dirty as possible outside so I have to get creative about reading and preparing my son for preschool.

Five Tips to Prepare Your Child For Preschool

1. Take Reading Time Outside – We read in our yard and at the park so we can get our outside and reading time in. I try to select books that are about nature, animals or include a summer activity…..like riding a bike. One of our favorites to take outside is “Froggy Rides a Bike” by Jonathan London.  My son was ready to learn to ride his bike after reading about how Froggy gets his first bike.froggy rides a bike

2. Take Advantage of Down Time – Early childhood literacy skills can be taught through activities, not just reading. We take advantage of our time when going for walks or driving in the car. I ask Aiden what different things we see are so that he can learn new words and associate it with an image. Our favorite game is saying the letters on street signs. Aiden says the letters, I tell him what the word is and he repeats it.

3. Sing – We sing a lot.  Songs and rhymes can help build vocabulary and develop sound discrimination. Both skills are crucial to the development of literacy. The size of a child’s vocabulary and his or her ability to discriminate sounds are predictors of how easily a child will learn to read when exposed to formal instruction. Aiden and I have learned  how to say “hello” in many different languages through the song “Hello to All the Children of the World.” One of Aiden’s favorite songs to sing to his baby brother is “Head, Shoulder, Knees and Toes.” “Itsy Bitsy Spider” can be a fun song to sing outside.

itsy bitsy spider

4. Dramatic Play – Let your child be the narrator of his favorite stories while you both act the story out outside. Dramatic play allows children to recognize that different tasks require different texts, to produce a wide variety of texts, and to act out stories they have heard.

5. Library Storytime – Whether it’s at childcare through the Racing to Read program or at the library, storytime is great for children. They will learn through stories, play, songs and much more. Plus, they get to be with other kids.

My son will participate in the Kenton County Public Library’s Racing to Read early childhood literacy program this summer. The Racing to Read team brings library materials and Summer Reading Club to the classroom. Classrooms at each center will read together and earn prizes.  This is one way we encourage the centers we serve to continue to read to their children during the summer months.

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Racing to Read serves 1,500 children ages 0-5 and visits 35 preschools and childcare centers monthly in Kenton County.  The goal of the program is to introduce children to books and reading so they are prepared to learn how to read when they enter kindergarten.  Children are able to check out two items with their Racing to Read library card. In addition the van offers teacher resources that can be used at the preschool/child care center.

Racing to Read staff members put together a lesson plan each month and adjust the lesson plan to meet specific center needs.  The picture below represents a lesson plan for April.

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Not too long ago the Racing to Read staff received a lovely thank you note pictured below.  The note is from Julie Learning Center located in Park Hills.

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The Read Racer has a few afternoon spots available. If your childcare facility or preschool is not currently receiving visits from the Read Racer the director of the center can call Kari Jones at 859-962-4061 to schedule a visit.  We also currently have a waiting list for centers that require a morning slot.

If you would like to learn more about Racing to Read services or all Outreach services, please visit us at http://www.kentonlibrary.org/outreach.

Check out the library Early Literacy Pinterest page and suggested books to prepare your child for preschool. Visit the Kenton County Public Library Facebook page to enter to win preschool books and a movie!

Written by Kari Jones – Outreach Coordinator —Covington Branch

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The Best 10 Young Adult Books of 2013

Young Adult novels are not just for teens anymore. YA fiction is, in my opinion, the most popular trend in fiction right now, and it will continue to draw readers of all ages – at least until all of our favorite series are finished!

Here are my choices for the Top 10 Young Adult Books of 2013. I chose my favorites and what I thought were the most popular 10 books. They are then rated by how many times each book was checked out by you!

What is your #1 book of 2013? Do you agree with my choices? Sound off in the comments!

1. Scarlet by Marissa Meyer. Book #2 in The Lunar Chronicles.

2. Unravel Me by Tahereh Mafi. Book #2 in the Shatter Me series.

3. Prodigy by Marie Lu. Book #2 in the Legend series

4. Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell 

5. Dare You To by Katie McGarry

6. Clockwork Princess by Cassandra Clare

7. Allegiant by Veronica Roth

8. The Moon and More by Sarah Dessen

9. City of Lost Souls by Cassandra Clare

10. Rogue by Gina Damico

Scarlet (Lunar Chronicles, #2)

Unravel Me (Shatter Me, #2)Prodigy (Legend, #2)Eleanor & ParkDare You To (Pushing the Limits, #2)Clockwork Princess (The Infernal Devices, #3)

Allegiant (Divergent, #3)Image of itemImage of itemThe Moon and More

Click on the covers to find a link to each book in the library catalog – from there you can see where the books are on library shelves, put yourself on hold for one, or even check out an ebook copy.

skull icon.jpgFor fans of Gina Damico’s Croak series or teens who love reading we have a special event coming up! On Wednesday, December 4th at 5:30 p.m. Erlanger’s teen book club, Beyond the Book, will have a discussion of the series and live video chat with Gina Damico! She’ll talk about the series, answer your questions, and hopefully tell us a little bit about her forthcoming novels. You can find more info and register on our calendar or by going to Facebook!

 

This blog post was written by Eden Rassette, the Young Adult Programmer at KCPL Erlanger. You can find her at The Cosplaying Librarian.

Library Services Delivered to Your Home

When I was 11, I found out I would need major surgery to correct a problem with my spine. I missed a little over a month of school because I was confined to my home for recovery, and then after that month came to an end I had another three months of extremely limited activity.  I went to school and then came straight home every day. Prior to surgery, I’d gotten into the habit of visiting the library once every week or two and bringing home stacks of books each time – but suddenly I was faced with four months of being cut off from my reading supply. It was a shock for me, especially since this was before the age of the Kindle or the Nook and the possibility to browse through an entire library from the couch.

The goal of the Kenton County Public Library Homebound Services – now part of the larger Outreach Services department – is to provide services to the patrons within Kenton County who find themselves unable to physically visit the library. Most often, when this kind of outreach service is mentioned, people only think of the elderly and books. But in reality there is much more involved in what we do.  We work every day to take all of the excellent services that the Library is known for (like reference, circulation, reader’s advisory, programming, etc.), roll it all into one, and deliver them directly to the homes of our patrons.  Some of the people enrolled in the program are simply the residents of a local senior living facility, other times they are people who can’t get out of their own houses due to a disability, and sometimes they are people who are temporarily unable to use the library because of a serious illness or injury. We serve all ages.

Having books around wouldn’t have made the surgery itself any better for me, and it wouldn’t have shortened my recovery time.  However, it would have made the time pass much easier and faster for both me and my parents.  They certainly didn’t have the time to go get books for me – they had their hands full with helping me recover and maintaining a normal routine for my sister, all while they both worked their own jobs.  Visiting the library was a luxury – and just like other non-essential trips, it was months before it became a part of my life again.  If homebound services were available, the Library would have delivered library materials to me and my family members who were caring for me.

We are here to help Kenton County residents, young and old, who find themselves in a position where they can no longer get to the Library.  Whether it’s because of a disability, they can no longer drive or because they are recovering from a surgery like I was, they are suddenly without access to the Library’s resources. Our job in Homebound is to re-establish the connection between the patron and the library.

If you or someone you know is a Kenton County resident who finds themselves unable to get to the library due to medical limitations or providing care for someone, whether they are 2 or 92, please visit our website or call our office at 859-962-4062 for more information.

Have you used the Library Homebound services? What do you think of this service?

This post was written by Ashlee Hummeldorf with the Library Homebound Services

Welcome to the Library Blog

Welcome to the Kenton County Public Library Blog. I promise this won’t be boring and is totally worth the read. We will update the blog every Tuesday with posts about library materials and its services and relevant topics to the community. The posts will include topics on children’s, teens, adults, history and genealogy, outreach and more. Several of your favorite staff members will contribute to the blog.

We will also have fun contests and giveaways. In fact, let’s have one now. I have a cool Kenton County Public Library tote bag filled with goodies, including four tickets to the Cincinnati Museum Center (donated). Ways you can win:

1. Leave a comment here letting us know what you would like us to write about (required).

2. Become a fan of the Kenton County Public Library on Facebook and comment here that you did: http://www.facebook.com/KentonCountyPublicLibrary

3. Tell a friend about our blog through Twitter or Facebook and comment here that you did.

4. Subscribe to our blog.

You must do # 1 to be entered. Doing #2-4 will earn you extra chances to win. Enter to win by Monday, Oct. 1 at noon. Be sure to include your email address.

Good luck!