Test Taking Skills

SONY DSC

 

 

Whether you are an experienced test taker or a newbie, the Kenton County Public Library  has how-to guides and test preparation resources available in a variety of formats:  print, electronic, audio, and video.  There are several publishers of great test guides:  Barron’s, Schaum’s, Peterson’s, Language Express, McGraw Hill’s, Princeton Review, Kaplan and Dummies.  Check out this resource list.

Test Taking3

The library subscribes to the Learning Express database which is accessible for a library card holder.  All you have to do is register and you will be on your way to improving your test taking skills.  This is an amazing resource with practice tests on everything from the GED to the ACT to the GRE and many others.  You can take timed tests and start and stop when you need; it really helps get you in the right frame of mind for standardized tests.  The database also includes software tutorials, occupation practice tests and U.S. Citzenship.

 Test Taking2

 

If you need any help along the way, your local library reference desk is here to support you, please give us a call or stop by, we want to see you succeed!

Test Taking1

 

-post written by Erin DeSantis, Young Adult Librarian

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements
Share Your Favorite Books & Movies

Share Your Favorite Books & Movies

conspiracy 365I have one child in middle school and one in high school. I am lucky that they both have a natural love of reading. My son will find a series he loves and read every single book (Conspiracy 365 being the most recent). Once he’s finished, he’ll look for other books written by that author. My daughter mostly chooses her books based on her friends’ recommendations but once in a while she’ll still ask Ms. Amy at the Covington Branch what she should read next. I always loved sharing children’s books with my kids but now that they are older, I really enjoy sharing some of my favorite adult and YA books with them. We are also able to discover new books together. untitled

All three of us read the Hunger Games trilogy. This led to so many discussions in our home. My kids immediately got that this was about so much more than kids killing kids. These books started conversations about how government works, the division of classes, white and blue collared jobs, how a small group can make a difference and so much more.

to kill a mockingbirdTo Kill A Mockingbird is my favorite book of all time. My daughter took a stab at it in sixth grade but found it confusing. Now that she is in ninth grade she is trying again and loving it. I can’t wait until she finishes it so we can watch the movie together and discuss the book in-depth.

I have decided to reoutsidersread Flowers in the Attic since watching the recent Lifetime Movie. I’m hoping my daughter will want to read that as well. I am looking forward to The Outsiders being a book all three of us can share a love for. It’s fun to pick books that are also movies. We can read the book, discuss and then watch the movie together.

What books do you enjoy sharing with your children?

Love in Faces and Places

There is plenty of love in our Faces and Places Photograph Archive. Just in time for Valentine’s Day, I thought I would share some of the love and Valentine’s Day inspired photographs in our online archive.

AnniversariesFaces and Places contains many Silver, and Golden Wedding Anniversary photographs like this one of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Smith of Park Hills on May 5th, 1974.

Engagements- It was very popular in the 1960s and 70s for women to publish an engagement photograph in the local newspaper. Pictured is Judith Ann Stephens of Union, on June 3, 1965 who was engaged to Richard Lee Hammitt. You can search for engagement announcements in our Northern Kentucky Newspaper Index.

Image

Weddings- A lot of happy couples on their wedding day can be found by searching Faces and Places. I especially enjoy this August 2, 1981 wedding of Helen Buschard 75, to Charlie Williams, 81. Buschard is wheeled down the aisle by Robert Williams (Lakeside Place Administrator) who gave her away at the ceremony.

Image

Sweet Shops- Chocolates, candy, cakes and pies are all popular tokens of love on Valentine’s Day. Faces and Places has photographs of local sweet and candy shops, like this picture of Katherine Hartmann. Hartmann was the owner of Lily’s Candies at 9th and Madison, and she is ready for for the Valentine’s Day rush on February 12, 1982. Also, we’ve added local sweet shops to our Historypin account! 

Image

These are just a few of the images of love and Valentine’s Day we found in Faces and Places. What is your favorite love inspired picture in the Faces and Places collection? Have you found a relatives engagement, anniversary or wedding photograph? Tell us in the comments below!

Written by Cierra Earl – Library Associate in the Local History and Genealogy Department at Covington

Library Providing Services at Home

About to celebrate her 90th birthday, Mrs. Jackie Linneman can honestly say she has had a lifelong relationship with the public library system.  An avid reader from a very young age, Jackie fondly recalls her trips to the former location of the public library in Covington.  In fact, the Carnegie Library at 10th and Scott was her first library.

Over the course of her life, Jackie has moved out of the Tri-state area and back again a handful of times, and she says that each time she moved to a new city, the first thing she looked for was the nearest public library.  “Mrs. Linneman always finds her library people!” she stated proudly during our interview.  “Librarians…I just love them!  I don’t know what I’d do without them.  I am very, very lucky.”

Jackie homebound

Mrs. Lucille Poetter, Mrs. Evelyn McVey, Mrs. Jackie Linneman entering Coppin’s in 1977.

Eight years ago, Jackie retired from her job selling perfume in downtown Cincinnati, and moved into an apartment at Atria Highland Crossing, a senior living facility in Fort Wright, KY. Prior to that move, she had been living in Fort Thomas and was a devoted patron of the Campbell County Public Library system.  “I lived just down the hill from the library, and I would walk down our drive.  But then when it got a little difficult for me to walk, that’s when I got the walker – just to be able to go to the library! And they told me one day when I went in, ‘Jackie, you can actually get these sent to your home!’  Then, when I got ready to move into here, that was the first thing I asked: could I still have that service?”  A Campbell County librarian was quick to get Jackie in touch with the Homebound department at Kenton County.

homebound van

Homebound (a part of the now combined Outreach Department) delivers items to the residents of Highland Crossing every other Monday.  Each and every time we bring a bag full of the newest biographies and memoirs for Jackie.  We have it written in her record that we are never to bring fewer than four books for her.  Living her life as she does now – mostly indoors and with limited mobility – the books we bring to her are her windows to the world.  Her friends and family members know how much she loves to read and constantly keep her up to date on the newest books – that’s how she always seems to be ahead of the crowd in making her requests for new materials.  Even though she doesn’t use a computer, she still has almost constant access to information about the latest books being published.  “My daughter-in-law sends me articles from The Philadelphia Enquirer.  She sends me ripped out pages from magazines with book reviews, and people are always telling me about new names and reviews of things I should read.  I get that New York one, too.  My son sends me The New York Observer…”

Even as we talked during our interview, she began shuffling through the papers on her side table and then stopped to hand me the most recent compilation of reviews and notes she had set aside for her librarians’ next visit.

When I asked her to describe what the Homebound services meant for her and how it improved her daily life, she didn’t even have to stop to think about it: “It’s a life saver to me – to be in a place like this and have your services.  Activities….well, I’m just not into.  But your service! It’s wonderful, in all sincerity.  There’s no bull about it.  Like I say, it’s my life saver.”

The activities Jackie mentioned during our chat are another facet of the KCPL Outreach Department.  Although she is less social and doesn’t take advantage of library outreach programming, many of our other patrons look forward to the mornings when we come by to help trigger memories and share life experiences.  At some senior centers we do trivia challenges, a proven technique for improving and maintaining brain function in older adults.  “Trivia games provide mental stimulation, an important component to mental and cognitive health in aging minds. Regular mental stimulation can actually delay the onset of diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer’s, which impair cognitive functioning. Trivia games require memory and stimulate the pathways through the cerebral cortex required to link the question to the image or to the answer.”  (Taken from an article by Cheryl Cirelli – http://seniors.lovetoknow.com/Trivia_Games_for_the_Elderly ).

We often try to incorporate local interest into our programming, and we are constantly working on new ideas for future programs.  Recently we began developing visual-storytelling programs by adapting illustrated books into slideshows.  As slideshows, we are able to project the illustrations in a large format as we read the corresponding story aloud.  The first story we used for this idea was “A Cincinnati Night Before Christmas”, a children’s book written by Nadine Woodard Huffman and illustrated by Marilyn M. Lebhar.  The story is about Matty, a young boy staying with his grandparents in Cincinnati at Christmas, and the readers are exposed to all of the wonderful traditions of Cincinnati during the holidays.  After hearing the story and seeing the illustrations, the residents at Covington Ladies’ Home spent nearly 30 minutes talking and reminiscing about their own family traditions during Christmas in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky.

Renee Moore, Director of Recreational Therapy at Providence Pavilion in Covington speaks very highly of the programming her residents have been enjoying twice a month for just over two years.  The audience may vary from 8 to 20 participants each time, but as Renee says, “they always leave knowing something new, and they talk about it all day!”  Renee’s favorite program in the past year happened over the summer.  Outreach Coordinator Kari Jones presented a slideshow all about ice cream for National Ice Cream Month.  Reflecting on the program, Renee told me how Kari talked with the residents, and “they all went back to their childhoods.”

Aside from the entertainment factor that many of our programs provide, Renee believes that outreach programming is an invaluable part of our service.  “It is important, because our residents learn about different things, or even go back in time.  We as activity directors may miss something, but the outreach programmers don’t.  For example, the ice cream presentation.  Yes, I knew it was National Ice Cream Month, so I was serving ice cream every Friday.  But I never thought about the history of it, or of asking the residents about it.”

HomeboundFlyer150Between our work delivering library materials to individuals and offering chances to reminisce or learn new things, the KCPL Outreach Department does everything possible to make sure the needs of our patrons are being met across the county.  Find out more about the Homebound services and Outreach Programming by calling 859.962.4062 or visiting http://www.kentonlibrary.org/outreach/homebound.

Ashlee Brown, Homebound Services Associate, wrote this post.